Early Diagnosis

After more than 30 years of studies and trials and hundreds of millions of dollars, it has been proven that early detection is the only contributing factor for better cancer control and improved survival. Early detection and early intervention of progressive prostate cancer may help to decrease the 40,000 prostate cancer-related deaths each year.

All men 50 years or older should have a PSA test (blood test), an annual rectal exam and, if necessary, a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). Men between the ages of 40 and 49 should have a PSA screening if an immediate family member has prostate cancer or if they are African American.

Early detection and early intervention of progressive prostate cancer may help to decrease the 40,000 prostate cancer-related deaths each year. The updated American Cancer Society’s recommendations for prostate cancer detection in asymptomatic men are that annual PSA and DRE (digital rectal examination) should be offered to men aged 50 or older who have at least a 10-year life expectancy, and to younger men at higher risk, such as African-American men or men with a strong familiar predisposition to prostate cancer (two or more affected first-degree relatives, e.g., father, brother).

Patients should be given information regarding the potential risks and benefits of intervention.

It is our recommendation that a patient should proceed to a transrectal ultrasound if the PSA level is more than 2.5 ng/ml or the digital rectal examination is abnormal, regardless of the PSA level. For high risk men, an ultrasound examination is recommended if their PSA level is over 2.0 mg/ml.

PIOA Ongoing Clinical Trial

The Prostate Institute of America is performing an ongoing clinical trial for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. Please review [&hellip